Community-Engaged Scholarship Courses at GW

 Students meet with the Executive Director of Centronia, an organization they are learning to write a grant for in HSSJ 3110: Nonprofit and organization administration

Students meet with the Executive Director of Centronia, an organization they are learning to write a grant for in HSSJ 3110: Nonprofit and organization administration

Community Engaged Scholarship Courses at GW

School of Business

BADM 1002: First Year Development Faculty TBA

Community development is a key focus area for the First Year Development Program. During the spring semester, first year business students will have the opportunity to engage in a community development project with a small group within their FYDP class.

  • Gain community engagement experience that may be integrated into your GWSB approved resume.

  • Demonstrate cultural competency and civility in interacting with diverse poulations.

  • Describe how the intersecting social identities of oneself and others shape life experiences and access to resources and opportunities.

  • Identify the ways in which social identity, power and privilege vary across microcosms of the Washington DC Community

 School of Medicine and Health Sciences

HSCI 2110: Disease Prevention/ Health Promotion Dr. Maranda Ward


In this 8 week online course, students will review basic public health concepts, especially those regarding prevention. Emphasis will be on achieving health equity through disease prevention and health promotion to advance U.S. community, population, and public health. Students will also study and propose how to engage a community of interest into health education or promotion program planning.

HSCI 2195: Applied Health Equity Dr. Maranda Ward


This 15 week community-engaged course will introduce students to the historical health disparities and long-term health inequities faced by many low-income, Black residents in Washington, DC. This course is designed to prepare students to translate a range of health equity concepts and competencies into practice.

PT 8481: Interprofessional Community Practicum Dr. Wentzell

Doctorate of Physical Therapy students select a community engaged partnership team to work on. Each team works directly with a community partner in the DC Metro community that addresses health in underserved communities in some form. The projects come from identified needs within the organization and the students help to meet those needs with the help of mentorship from faculty advisors. Community partners provide feedback on the project during and at the completion.

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

BME 4920W: Biomedical Engineering Capstone Project Lab Dr. Lee

BME 4920W and 4925W are Biomedical Engineering's Capstone Design sequence. Students work in teams to solve problems in human health posed by clinicians and researchers who act as clients. Students work with their clients to define what their device must do and how well it must perform. They then create a solution, build and test a prototype, document their work, and present it to their client and the University community.

BME 4925W: Biomedical Engineering Capstone Project Lab Dr. Lee

BME 4920W and 4925W are Biomedical Engineering's Capstone Design sequence. Students work in teams to solve problems in human health posed by clinicians and researchers who act as clients. Students work with their clients to define what their device must do and how well it must perform. They then create a solution, build and test a prototype, document their work, and present it to their client and the University community.

Columbian College of Arts and Sciences

COMM 1041: Interpersonal Communication Dr. Abbie Weiner

The purpose of this course is to provide students an opportunity to develop an understanding of the theories and principles of interpersonal communication simultaneous within a service-learning environment.

GWTCH 1001: Step 1: Inquiry Based Approaches to Teaching Dr. Bitler


Students who want to explore teaching careers become familiar with lesson plan development by writing, teaching, and observing lessons in an elementary school classroom. While students build and practice inquiry-based lesson design skills, they also become familiar with and practice classroom management in the elementary school setting. As a result of the Step 1 experiences, students are able to decide to continue exploring teaching as a career. Through this experience local teachers gain exposure to new pedagogical and innovative innovative inquiry based lessons, and local students engage in lessons which feature activity content to spark interest in lifelong learning and interest in STEM

GWTCH 1002: Step 2: Inquiry-Based Lesson Design Dr. Baker

Students who want to explore teaching careers become familiar with lesson plan development by writing, teaching, and observing lessons in a middle school classroom. While students build and practice inquiry-based lesson design skills, they also become familiar with and practice classroom management in an elementary school setting. As a result of the Step 2 experiences, students are able to decide to continue to explore teaching as a career. Through this experience local teachers gain exposure to new pedagogical and innovative inquiry-based lessons, and local students engage in lesson which feature activity before content to spark interest in lifelong learning and interest in STEM.

GWTCH 3103: Project Based Learning Dr. Sikorski

Students who have an interest in a future in teaching learn about student-centered, project-based learning in this course through reading, discussing, observing, writing, and teaching lessons for students who attend school in the DC community. Through this experience local teachers gain exposure to new pedagogical and innovative inquiry-based lessons, and local students engage in lessons which feature activity before content to not only spark but sustain interest in lifelong learning and interest in STEM.

HIST 2020W: Washington DC History, Culture and Politics Dr. Klemek

Course promotes civic engagement through varied activities, including service learning, archival research writing (as well as revising) interpretations of local urban history, and finally the presentation of a city’s past to the community that now inhabits it. Over the semester, students will undertake a collective historical documentation project focusing on a Washington neighborhood (Foggy Bottom) over time. They will utilize area historical collections and partner with community organizations to examine and write up the history of specific DC sites, and ultimately present their findings at public venues and/or online. The service component will thus be historical in nature and involve an engagement with community organizations both during the research as well as the delivery of the students' final written documentation.

HSSJ 2170: Interpersonal Relationships Sangeeta Prasad

HSSJ 2170 is a course on interpersonal relationships that uses a lens of social justice and critically analyzes how intersections of identity impact relationships.  Students are required to complete a 30-hour practicum at community-based agencies that serve disenfranchised community members.

HSSJ 3100W: Program Planning and Evaluation Dr. Michelle Kelso


Program planning and evaluation activities are essential to organizations, governments and businesses. We will begin class by delving into evaluation, reviewing research methods, and planning and implementing evaluation research. Through case studies and on-site field experiences, students will analyze processes by which organizational needs are assessed and programs planned.

HSSJ 4198: The Citizen Leader Dr. Wendy Wagner

Public discourse is teeming with advice about leadership, opinions about what citizenship is, and what service in the community should look like. Effectiveness as a citizen leader requires a more complex understanding of each of these constructs and their implications. In this course, we will explore several ways that leadership, citizenship, and service have been framed by scholars. Ultimately, you will arrive at your own informed and well-considered philosophy, which will guide you as a student leader at GW and a citizen-leader in the world. This is a community-engaged scholarship course, and includes 30 hours of service with a local community organization addressing issues of poverty, affordable housing, food security, or youth development. This course is restricted to GW students in the Civic House Scholars Program.

SOCY 2105: Social Problems in America Dr. Greg Squires

This class will examine the concept of social problems and many specific social problems that are that are widely recognized as features of American society. We will analyze the major theoretical explanations of critical social problems, the ideological framework in which those theories are rooted, and the policy implications of these perspectives.We will attempt to assess how and why different actors (e.g. public officials, corporate executives, college professors) define social problems & act on their competing perspectives. Hopefully, the class will assist students in shaping their personalresponses to those problems affecting their lives and their communities.

SPAN 3040: Advanced Spanish Learning Professor Dolores Perillan

The Advanced Spanish Service Learning course is based on the strong tradition of community building in the Spanish speaking world. The community spirit of Spain and Latin America is brought to life in our midst through the magic and poetry of its people. We find this spirit in our local Latino community, we are enriched by its powerful array and diversity, and we are called to action to support it. Span 3040 students engage with various community partners, develop long-lasting relationships, and share their commitment, discoveries and enterprises in creative ways. Operación Impacto is an example, the extension to other Spanish students, invited as well to experience the impact of service. The GW Chávez~Huerta initiative to honor the legacy of social justice giants like César Chávez and Dolores Huerta is our long lasting commitment and invitation to the GW community and beyond!

SPAN 4480: Studies in Latinx Cultural Production Manuel Cuellar

What and who is Latinx? How do Latinx imaginaries shape and how are they shaped by the so called "American" experience? This course provides and overview of how Latinxs have created competing representations of their experience in contemporary cultural production within the United States. We will examine the factors that determine the overrepresentation or underrepresentation of certain Latinx groups.

TRDA 3131W: Theatre of Social Change Dr. Leslie Jacobsen

This course focuses on the efficacy of using the arts to address issues within our society. The students will examine produced works of representative 20th and 21st century playwrights, which address violence against women, gender inequality, homophobia, racism, trauma of war, Nativism, religious discrimination, and other injustices within our society. We will analyze the techniques used by the playwrights, and how-or whether-these techniques inspire audiences to effect change.

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