Colleen Packard Wins the Nashman Prize

Colleen Packard, a Master’s student pursuing a degree in Master's of Public Health in Community-Oriented Primary Care, has won the Nashman Prize for her Community-Based Participatory Research! Undergraduate and graduate students who present their research at the annual GW Research Days event are invited to submit for consideration for the Nashman Prize, which recognizes excellence in Community-Based Participatory Research.

Read more about her research below, and read more about the Nashman Prize here.

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Colleen’s Project: Parent & Student Knowledge, Attitude, and Perceptions of Youth Sports Injuries the Feasibility of Expanding Athletics Activities Diversity in a Community Non-Profit Organization will be presented at the Nashman Symposium on April 26th sign up here to attend https://givepul.se/nrvz0

Colleen did research with Beacon House, a community non-profit organization located in the Edgewood Commons complex of Washington, DC whose mission is to close the education achievement gap for children in Ward 5. Beacon House’s athletics program is a signature offering of the organization, and the tackle football program is the largest and most successful of the sports offered.

However, with increased awareness of concussion risk in youth sports, Beacon House requested this research be done in order to adequately inform any future action by its administration. The purpose of this study is to conduct an assessment of parent and student perceptions of youth sports injuries. The study also surveys Beacon House parents and students to see how the athletics program could potentially expand in the future. The mixed-methods study utilizes survey measures and focus groups to measure both parent and student knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of concussions. The athletics interest form will furthermore show which sports parents and students are interested in playing, either in lieu of or in addition to tackle football. All methods were reviewed by Beacon House before beginning data collection, and Beacon House staff are integral to participant recruitment.

Learn more at beaconhousedc.org.

IJRSLCE Call for Papers on Service Learning and Community Engagement

Paper Proposals due May 15th!

IJRSLCE Editorial Board has released a request for manuscripts they are seeking submissions, conveying the extent of scholarship in the field of service-learning and community engagement that represent a range of methodologies.

Author Guidelines are presented on the IJRSLCE website. To submit a manuscript, you must register on the site. Papers are due May 15, 2019. For more details and information, please email Glenn Bowwn (gbowen@barry.edu) and Clayton Hurd (churd@compact.org).

Next Steps for Students

As we near the end of another semester, our students often need help identifying their next steps, given the significant learning experience they have had. Below are a few suggestions to forward to them.

November Faculty Spotlight: Maranda Ward

Our November faculty spotlight is Nashman affiliate faculty, Dr. Maranda C. Ward from GW's School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS). She is currently teaching two Nashman designated Community-Engaged Scholarship courses.  One is an online course where she serves as the course director and has integrated IRB-approved research funded by the GW SMHS Center for Faculty Excellence, HSCI 2110: Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.  The other is funded by a Nashman course development grant, HSCI 2195: Applied Health Equity.  Nashman's Community-Engaged Scholar, Emebte Atanaw, sat down with Dr. Ward to ask about her role as an Nashman affiliate faculty and her newest course offering.  

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New Course, The Autism Experience: A Public Health Perspective

PUBH 6299. 13 The Autism Experience: A Public Health Perspective

2 credit hours Friday, 10:10am - noon

Open to graduate and upper level undergraduate students

Instructor, Sean D. Cleary, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor of Epidemiology sdcleary@gwu.edu

A public health perspective of the autism experience is explored through service learning and community participatory research methods engaging autistic young adults, their parents, researchers, clinicians and other service providers. The course covers the science, viewpoints, and experience of autism with a focus on young adults transitioning to adulthood. Collaboratively with community advocates, students will explore research relevant to the autistic community.

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Storytelling as Scholarship: Exploring Digital Stories, PhotoVoice and Other Methods

The 2019 Nashman Faculty Learning Communities (FLC) are forming now. These small inter-disciplinary/inter-professional groups meet monthly for one year to discuss and learn collectively about their topic of interest. All GW faculty and administrators are welcome. Click here for information about other FLC's forming for 2019.

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