Call for Posters Inclusion, Transformation & Ethical, Critical Global Citizenship Work

Poster presentations are now being accepted through the Call for Posters at the The Globalsl Network 6th Summit, November 3 - 5, 2019, at Clemson University. Early bird registration open now!

Founded nearly a decade ago, with the aim of improving quality in community-campus partnerships advanced in the name of global citizenship, The Globalsl Network now represents more than 15 institutions concerned with best practices and transformative outcomes.

Keynotes and plenaries will focus on Asset-based Local Engagement and Inclusive Community Building in the United States, On-Campus Organizing to Ensure Ethical Engagement in Health-Related Environments around the World, and The Praxis of Engineering: Theory and Value-Driven Practice. A full program is forthcoming; the overall schedule is available here. Early bird registration ($350) is available through July 15; be sure to book your accommodations and travel.

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What We're Reading Now: New Report on College Students and Freedom of Speech

New Report from CollegePulse via the Knight Foundation on College Students and Freedom of Speech

“There is a new class of students on college campuses, increasingly varied in background and ideology, who are grappling with the reach and limits of free speech and what it means in the 21st century. Studying their views is key to understanding the impact that they may have on rights that are fundamental to our democracy,” said Sam Gill, Knight Foundation vice president for learning and communities.”

Other key findings include:

Opinions on whether it’s more important to promote an inclusive society that welcomes diverse groups or to protect free speech are sharply divided by gender, race and religion.

  • Nearly six in 10 college women say that promoting an inclusive society is the more important value, versus 28 percent of college men. Seventy-one percent of college men favor protecting free speech over inclusivity, while only 41 percent of college women express this view.

  • Black college students are more likely than students of other racial and ethnic backgrounds to say that inclusivity is a more important value than free speech. More than six in 10 black college students agree that promoting an inclusive society that welcomes diverse groups is more important than protecting free speech. Forty-nine percent of Hispanic students and 42 percent of white students hold the same view. 

  • A majority of white (58 percent) students and half (50 percent) of Hispanic students say that protecting free speech rights should be the higher priority.

  • A majority of Mormon (81 percent), white evangelical Protestant (71 percent), white mainline Protestant (64 percent), and Catholic students (62 percent) say that protecting free speech is more important than promoting inclusivity. In contrast, a majority of Jewish students (65 percent), students who are members of East Asian religions such as Hinduism or Buddhism (60 percent), and religiously unaffiliated students (54 percent) say that promoting a welcoming, inclusive society is more important.

Faculty Spotlight Dr. Phyllis Ryder

Nashman Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Phyllis Ryder

Professor Ryder is an Associate Professor of Writing specializing in service learning, composition, academic literacy, faculty librarian partnerships for teaching academic research, rhetoric of democracy, public and community writing. Itohan Amu, a Community Engaged Scholar at the Nashman Center, sat down with Dr. Ryder to learn more about her work.

She has two current publications. The first is a book, Rhetorics for Community Action: Public Writing and Writing Publics https://www.amazon.com/Rhetorics-Community-Action-Cultural-Pedagogy/dp/0739137662 . The second is an article about her evolving understanding of the community partners that she works with, From Reciprocity to Interdependence: Mass Incarceration and Service Learning available here http://proxygw.wrlc.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eue&AN=121172789&site=ehost-live

We asked Professor Ryder how she incorporates service learning into her courses. She allows “students to work with organizations in DC in order to have a context to really think about language, writing and communication and also because it sparks some questions that students will often research”.  She made clear that she likes it because it helps people to understand that there’s a deeper purpose for the scholarship that happens at the university and understand the amount of impact that the students can make on the community by answering real world questions. Over the years, Professor Ryder has worked with over 20 community partners including: Life Pieces to Masterpieces, DC Central Kitchen, Free Minds Book Club, US Dream Academy and many more.

During the course of her class, Professor Ryder talks about what’s actually happening among community organizations and how they conceptualize social change while doing their work and what it means to bring a community together. Professor Ryder believes that it is important for GW students and professors to be involved in the community because it forces them to keep testing their assumptions. It’s important for them to understand the issues happening today and the new layers that come with it. She stated that “what’s happening on the ground is dynamic and if we’re not plugged into that, then scholars and teachers are not necessarily doing their scholarship fully and are teaching in a limited way. Having that engagement with community keeps them humble and keeps them to adapt theories and goals.”

The Nashman Center appreciates Dr. Ryder’s work as a Nashman Affiliate, she chairs the Black Lives Matter Faculty Learning Community learn more about their work here and community engaged work in her course which you can learn more about here.

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Teagle Foundation Call for Grant Proposals Civic Education and Democracy

Teagle’s call for proposals is out!

The Teagle Foundation’s initiative is “to support and strengthen liberal arts education, which we see as fundamental to meaningful work, effective citizenship, and a fulfilling life.” It seeks to strengthen civic education throughout the undergraduate curriculum and disciplines as a means of challenging and defining American democracy.  

The most successful proposals are expected to transcend additions to the course catalog and mirror an initiative to integrative learning, aiding the student body and capable of being sustained well beyond the distribution of the grant.  See  http://www.teaglefoundation.org/Grants-Initiatives/How-We-Grant/For-Grantseekers-(1) for details on submission.  

2019 Active Citizens Conference

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The William and Mary 2019 Active Citizens Conference will take place on March 23rd, 2019, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Join students, faculty, and community leaders coming together to learn about the best practices for impacting community and mobilizing social change. 

Register for the conference by March 13. Thanks to generous sponsors the event will now be free with transportation provided by the Nashman Center, so this is a great opportunity to learn and collaborate with engaged students from across the area!

Contact Colleen (cmpack618@gwmail.gwu.edu) to secure transportation with Nashman. Students are encouraged to register by Friday March 1st so that we have time to secure registration & transportation.

New Issue of Public-Beyond Mass Incarceration: New Horizons of Liberation and Freedom    

PUBLIC is the Journal of Imagining America, a professional association for public artists and scholars. This latest issue reflects on the efforts of university-community collaborations and shares critical writing and innovative projects that seek to transform the practices of incarceration. You can view it online now at public.imaginingamerica.org.

The contributors to the issue explore the complexities of incarceration from lived experiences as incarcerated, formerly incarcerated, and system impacted people, and scholars, practitioners, and artists whose work addresses our carceral systems. These pedagogical approaches and pedagogies are tied to groundbreaking research initiatives, detailing the potentials and challenges of bringing institutional, geographical, and demographic information to a public audience in an effort to raise questions that are too often not asked. 

William and Mary Active Citizens Conference Call For Proposals Open: Deadline 2/20/19

Do you have students from Community Engaged Scholarship Courses with presentations to share?

Registrations and workshop proposals for the 2019 Active Citizens Conference are now being accepted. This is a student-focused conference for educating, uniting, and inspiring active citizenship. The conference is close enough to make transportation costs low and will be held Saturday, March 23 at William & Mary.

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A note on the Passing of Senator Harris Wofford from Amy Cohen Executive Director, Nashman Center

We join the country in mourning the passing of Senator Harris Wofford with this remembrance from Amy Cohen.

I note with sadness the passing of Senator Harris Wofford. Harris helped to bend the arc of history toward justice through his many significant roles in American history. His obituary in the Washington Post outlines many of them, including as a friend and champion of Dr King and the civil rights movement. I was proud to work for and with Harris at the federal Corporation for National and Community Service, which he led during the 1990s. Before that, while US Senator from Pennsylvania, he was instrumental in bringing significant opportunities for students in higher education to contribute to their surrounding communities through Federal Work Study (FWS). By passing legislation that required a minimum of 7% of FWS funds to be used for community service at each higher education institution, he effectively created the greatest opportunity for student community service. His was an extraordinary life lived in large part with dedication to public service ad helping the US and individuals to realize their best aspirations.

Featured Speaker: John Saltmarsh on How Community-Engaged Scholarship is Transforming Higher Education

Featured Speaker: John Saltmarsh on How Community-Engaged Scholarship is Transforming Higher Education

Join the Nashman Center on Wednesday, January 30th, 9:00-10:45am, as we welcome Dr. John Saltmarsh to campus for a talk and facilitated discussion,

“How Community-Engaged Scholarship is Transforming Higher Education.”

(RSVP HERE)

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Democracy, Call for Abstracts & New Book, "Jumping into Civic Life: Stories of Public Work from Extension Professionals"

Imagining America’s Newsletter has some great content this month:

Looking for a short read to motivate your civic thinking for the next semester?

Check out Democracy Under Siege: A Category 4 Storm https://www.aacu.org/aacu-news/newsletter/2018/november/perspectives

How about a longer read for over break? Check out "Jumping into Civic Life: Stories of Public Work from Extension Professionals" 

Edited by Scott J. Peters (former IA faculty co-director), Theodore R. Alter, and Timothy J. Shaffer. Through eight richly-detailed oral histories, this book helps to open our imagination to the possibilities for professionals to make constructive contributions to the task of making democracy work as it should. The first-hand stories of public work in these oral histories are told by professionals from six different states who either chose or were invited to jump into civic life as active participants. Kettering Foundation Press

Ready to share new Community Engaged Scholarship class next semester? Call for Abstracts: 2019 Community Development Education Symposium -Funding is Available!

The consortium invites Imagining America members who teach community development courses to submit an abstract proposal for the 2019 Community Development Education Symposium that will take place in Detroit, MI, from May 16th-19th. The symposium will convene educators to discuss innovative curricula and educational practices, while exploring the current and future state of community development education.

A limited number of travel stipends will be made available to individuals that are accepted to participate in the symposium. For more information regarding participation please click the link, here.

In addition, individuals participating in the symposium will also be eligible to apply for one of five community development innovation mini-grants (approximately $5,000/grant). 

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