Call for Papers International Undergraduate Journal for Service-learning, Leadership and Social Change

Did you present your community engaged scholarship for a class? At the symposium? Share your work with the world!

The International Undergraduate Journal for Service-learning, Leadership and Social Change has a call for papers.  You can view the Journal athttp://opus.govst.edu/iujsl/ 

The Journal is dedicated to providing undergraduate students a venue to discuss their service-learning projects and experiences.  The Journal considers three types of articles:

            1) Articles that discuss the development of a service-learning project and the  

                 impact of the project on the community served;

            2) A case study of a service-learning project;

            3) A reflection on service-learning and the development of personal leadership.

Each article will be reviewed by selected readers and the member of the editorial board.  Manuscripts should be typed double-spaced, excluding block quotations which should be typed single-spaced, and references.  To ensure anonymity, author’s names and affiliation should appear on a separate cover page.  Articles should not exceed 15 pages.  Authors should follow APA format.

The Journal accepts Book Reviews on service-learning and social change.  Book reviews should not exceed 2 pages and include Book Title, Author, and Publisher.

Submissions should be sent in Word format.  DO NOT HAVE HEADERS OR PAGE NUMBERING.

Submit by e-mail to: Ned Scott Laff, Ph.D.                       

ned.laff@gmail.com                                                                       

Course: Theatre for Social Change TRDA 3131W

Looking for a unique way to satisfy your CCAS Writing in the Disciplines requirement? Sign up for Theatre for Social Change this fall!

   11:10 to 12:25 on Mon./Wed.    Professor Leslie Jacobson    All theatre is political – it either supports or challenges the  status quo .    This idea will be tested through our semester together.    Theatre gives the audience – and the performers – opportunities to experiment with a variety of life choices, and to experience individual and societal challenges in a safe creative space. This course will focus on theatre of social change as practiced in the 20th and early 21st centuries. Together, we will explore case studies from South Africa, Europe, and the US. You will research and write about a particular play, theatre company, or practitioner using theatre to effect societal change.   And you will create and perform, individually or with others in the class, a final project that is a piece of social action theatre.

11:10 to 12:25 on Mon./Wed.

Professor Leslie Jacobson

All theatre is political – it either supports or challenges the status quo. This idea will be tested through our semester together.

Theatre gives the audience – and the performers – opportunities to experiment with a variety of life choices, and to experience individual and societal challenges in a safe creative space. This course will focus on theatre of social change as practiced in the 20th and early 21st centuries. Together, we will explore case studies from South Africa, Europe, and the US. You will research and write about a particular play, theatre company, or practitioner using theatre to effect societal change. 

And you will create and perform, individually or with others in the class, a final project that is a piece of social action theatre.

Imagining America Arts and Scholars in Public Life: Call for Proposals Due 6/22

Faculty and students are invited to submit proposals on their research and scholarship.

Transformative Imaginations: Decarceration and Liberatory Futures

 Invitation for Proposals
Imagining America 18th National Gathering

Chicago, Illinois | Friday-Sunday, October 19-21, 2018 | #18IAGathering
Submission Deadline: Friday, June 22

We are facing the largest social crisis in modern U.S. history, and it is a crisis that, on some level, affects every one of us. From children to seniors, foreign nationals to U.S. citizens, the United States’ carceral system locks up more than 10 million individuals each year through a vast network of prisons, jails, juvenile correctional facilities, immigration detention facilities, civil commitment centers, and state psychiatric centers. This system restricts the lives of nearly 5 million individuals currently on probation or parole, and it destabilizes an exponential number of families and communities. Addressing a crisis of this magnitude requires moving beyond a public discourse limited by preconceptions of what is achievable.
 

Imagining America believes that the arts, design, and the humanities provide us with tools and practices that can free our imaginations as to what is possible. The 2018 Imagining America National Gathering seeks to bring people together to imagine, explore, and make real a world beyond incarceration and to envision liberatory futures – futures that include worlds where resources invested in carceral economies are directed to housing, health care, and public education.
 

Drawing on traditions of speculative, utopian, and Afrofuturist inquiry while engaging with transformative work already in progress, Imagining America invites proposals that advance dialogue, research, programs, and advocacy regarding the impacts of carceral systems – both historical and contemporary – on our communities. Proposals need not explicitly address incarceration, but should contribute to a vision of justice motivated by the healing of communities and individuals.
 

We encourage proposals from currently and formerly incarcerated individuals, people directly impacted by the carceral system, activists, community organizers, artists, designers, students, faculty, and staff from IA member campuses and beyond, and others engaged in liberatory visioning and work. We especially encourage proposals that highlight collaboration, dialogue, community engagement, and creative forms of expression.

This year’s gathering also builds upon current work being done by Illinois Humanities through an initiative called Envisioning Justice (https://envisioningjustice.org). Using the arts and humanities, Envisioning Justice seeks to strengthen efforts in Chicago to reimagine our criminal legal system and is inspired by a commitment to justice, accountability, safety, support, and restoration for all people. Launched in 2017, Envisioning Justice will continue through 2019, thereby providing space for the discussions, works, and imaginings that take place during the gathering to continue.
 

Norman Rockwell's Four Freedoms Coming to GW Textile Museum Spring of 2019

Norman Rockwell's Four Freedoms will be on display at GWU at the textile museum in the spring of 2019. This could be a great opportunity for students to think about a variety of topics-art, civic engagement, political science, sociology, economics. Think about adding an exhibit visit or readings about Rockwell and the political events that inspired project to your Spring 2019 syllabus. 

To start your reading here are two articles on how you can use Rockwell to engage your students in discussion about this work and it's meaning in 2018-2019

https://upcountryonline.wordpress.com/2018/02/28/finding-common-ground-the-making-of-community/

 https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/08/arts/new-york-historical-society-norman-rockwell-four-freedoms.html

Recap of the AAC&U Annual Meeting

This year's AAC&U (Association of American Colleges and Universities) meeting featured a full-day pre-meeting symposium on Civic Engagement as well as three days of rich discussions on issues related to liberal education for the public good, excellence that is inclusive of all students, assessment of learning outcomes, and preparing students for rich personal, professional and civic lives. A few highlights and resources worth sharing:

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Fall 2017 Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship

At the end of each semester, the Nashman Center hosts the Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship. This event invites students, faculty, and community partners to share their experiences, disseminate findings, and learn about many other campus/community initiatives.

PLEASE SHARE THE DATE AND ENCOURAGE YOUR STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE. The Fall Symposium is Friday, December 8th, Marvin Center 3rd floor.

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Now Publicly Available: Deliberative Pedagogy Webinar hosted by IASLCE

IARSLCE recently hosted a webinar titled: "Deliberative Pedagogy: What it is, where it connects with Community Engagement, and Why it Matters." Tim Shaffer, assistant professor in the department of communication studies and assistant director of the Institute for Civic Discourse at Kansas State University. The recording of the webinar is now available here as well as a download of the powerpoint used throughout the discussion available here.. 

Call for Poster Proposals: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

The GW University Teaching and Learning Center has released a call for papers. Faculty can apply to present a poster at the upcoming Teaching Day on September 28, 2017. Proposals are due by May 15, 2017. 

Posters are peer-reviewed, and any systematic inquiry of teaching and learning will be accepted as a proposal. For details on suggested research topics please refer to the website. 

For any other questions please contact Professor Maria de la Fuente (mjfuente@gwu.edu) or Professor Natalia Romanova (romanova@gwu.edu). 

New Webinar Series: Deliberative Pedagogy, by IARSLCE

IARSLCE introduces a new "Advances in Research Webinar Series" titled" Deliberative Pedagogy: What it is, Where it Connects with Community Engagement, and Why it Matters". The Webinar will take place on Thursday, April 13th, at noon. Dr. Timothy Shaffer, Assistant Professor, Communication Studies and the Assistant Director of the Institute for Civic Discourse and Democracy at Kansas State University will be leading the webinar. Please RSVP here to reserve your space. 

Publication Release: International Undergraduate Journal for Service-learning, Leadership and Social Change

The International Undergraduate Journal for Service Learning, Leadership, and Social Change publishes articles written by undergraduates that discuss development and impact of service-learning projects, case studies of established service-learning projects, and reflections on service-learning.

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